Monthly Archives: June 2018

Masaya Ka Na

(Inspired by Ed Sheeran’s “Happier”)

happier

Dati nating tagpua’y aking pinuntahan
Nakitang kamay mo’y mahigpit n’yang tangan
Kamakailan lamang nang ako’y iwanan
Kagyat kapalit ko’y iyong natagpuan

Mula sa malayo kayo’y pinagmasdan
Tila kay saya ninyong nagkukwentuhan
Nais mo bang aking tanggapin na lamang
Na kay bilis mong ako’y kinalimutan

Nagbubulungan kayo’t nagtatawanan
Puso’y hinagupit ng panghihinayang
Kasiyahan ninyong walang mapagsidlan
Animo’y krus ng kalbaryong aking pinasan

Kamay ko’y binitawa’t ika’y umalis
Dahil damdamin mo’y nasaktan ng labis
Ngunit umaasang iyong malilirip
Pagmamahal ko’y walang makahihigit

Masaya ka na ngang iba ang kapiling
Nakakalungkot ma’y aking tatanggapin
Nasasaktan ma’y akin ding aaminin
Nahihirapan akong ika’y limutin

Saan man magpunta’t ano man ang gawin
Ala-ala mo’y ayaw akong palayain
Anino itong nakabuntot sa akin
Aking naaaninag kahit pa madilim

Masaya ka na… paano naman ako
Kaligayahan ko’y nanggagaling sa ‘yo
Nasa bisig mo ang aking paraiso
Kung wala ka ay ‘di iinog ang mundo

Kung ang sayang iya’y panandalian lang
Kung sa bandang huli ika’y masasaktan
Huwag magatubiling ako’y balikan
Puso ko’y katukin kita’y pagbubuksan

How Colonialism Shaped the Filipino Character (2nd of 4 parts)

HARDPEN'S PORTFOLIO

Filipinos often ask questions like, “What would Philippines be like today had Spain not colonized the island nation? Would the Filipino character developed the way it is now had the Spaniards not succeeded in putting the natives in chains for more than three centuries?

1    What if the Americans observed the principle that “governments derived their just powers from the consent of the governed” [3] and decided not to stay in 1898 and allow the Filipinos to govern themselves? The Americans should have known better. That principle was the driving force of the declaration of their independence in 1776. It is touted to be the model for the right to self-determination, the very right that they deprived the Filipinos of when they colonized the Philippines. The Americans justified their occupation of the islands by saying that the Filipinos were not ready for self-governance. But how sure were they?  And even…

View original post 1,130 more words

How Colonialism Shaped the Filipino Character (1st of 4 parts)

For a better appreciation of who and what the Filipino is one has to decipher the Filipino psyche and identify the factors that contributed to its formation. An in-depth analysis of the character of these people would require a thorough examination of their history and racial origins. The Filipino cannot be figured out by establishing assumptions based on stereotyping and by magnifying him using a supremacist lens.

The pre-colonial Filipino was a race whose culture and genetic pool was a mix of  Negrito, Indones, Malay, Arab, Hindu and Chinese and whose spirit was either strengthened or weakened by the geographics of the island nation and its corresponding climate. There was a genetic and cultural identity flourishing in this part of Southeast Asia before the Portuguese explorer Magellan and his Spanish expedition landed in Mactan in 1521. There was a national identity and character evolving when the Spaniards, led by Miguel Lopez De Legazpi, came back in 1565 to establish a stronghold in what the Europeans would later on call “Las Islas Filipinas.”

What the discovery of the Laguna copperplate in 1989 accomplished was to prove that  “a well-organized form of government based on customary law” [1] existed in the Philippines long before the Spaniards came. The pre-colonial Filipino was not a lost soul rescued by the Europeans from the dark ages. There was an emerging racial entity when they came and it veered away from its natural course of becoming when the colonizers from the West succeeded in subduing the natives.

For  333 years that the Filipinos were under the mercy of the Spanish conquistadors. There were pocket revolts the Filipinos staged in different parts of the country to  overthrow the invaders from the Iberian Peninsula but were quelled. The most significant of those uprisings was that  one led by Francisco Dagohoy in Bohol that lasted for more than 80 years (1744-1929). Those attempts to vanquish the conquerors from Spain did not succeed because of the following: they were lacking in national character; based on limited geographical scales; and caused by non-encompassing issues[2].  It was only the 1896 revolution that succeeded  which eventually led to the declaration of Philippine independence in 1898.

But it was short-lived.

The Americans who the Filipinos thought came to help them establish a republic had other agenda. They duped Emilio Aguinaldo, the leader of the revolt against Spain, into believing that they didn’t need any colony and that they came to free the natives from the yoke of Spain. Then, the Filipinos watched helplessly as the Spaniards, too proud to accept defeat in the hands of the Indios they enslaved for centuries, surrendered to the Americans instead and was paid $20,000,000  for all the improvements they made in the Philippine islands during their colonial rule. That’s one of the conditions set  in the Treaty of Paris in 1898 which the two countries concluded without concurring with the Filipino people.

Would the Americans  pay the Spaniards that huge amount (which is worth more than half a billion dollars today) and get nothing in return? The answer is a resounding NO. America, then an emerging world power, needed to flex its muscles in the Pacific. The Philippines was the most ideal place for that.  So, the Americans, contrary to their promise which Aguinaldo said he  naively believed, declared Philippines a territory ceded to them by Spain.

It was a painful experience for the Filipinos. After centuries of struggle against Spain they finally had a chance to chart their own destiny as a nation. But the Americans stood on their way. The Filipinos had to  continue their search for that elusive freedom.

When the Spaniards left, the natives fought the more superior American forces.  It was a case of a “David” having to contend with a “Goliath.” But in this version, Goliath subdued David. The Filipinos gallantly stood their ground but eventually lost the Fil-American war after three long years of struggle.

So, the Philippines changed hands – from one colonial master to another, from the Spanish yoke to that of the American.

As a consequence of its being colonized by those two countries in the West, into the nation’s cultural and genetic pool, Spanish and American elements were assimilated. Also, the experiences of the Filipinos in those years of foreign domination have undoubtedly affected the evolution of their character. Even the policies implemented by the Spaniards and the Americans when they took turns in ruling the said nation have strongly contributed to that transformation.

The 20th century saw the emergence of a post-colonial identity, a character, that is distinctively Filipino, a character forged by the mixing of Asian and European influences, by frequent battering from natural calamities, and by the long period of colonization.

How did colonization affect the formation of the Filipino character? How did Spanish cruelty and American treachery impact the evolution of Filipino values and traits?

__________

[1] philippinestudies.net

[2] asianjournalusa.com

 

%d bloggers like this: